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> WTB: Zeiss ZKP2 or ZKP3
garrick
post Apr 16 2018, 11:07 AM
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Hello - new member here. I'm an architect and former Zeiss show presenter and programmer, experienced with the Universarium Model IX at the Hayden Planetarium in NYC and the ZKP3 at the Dreyfuss Planetarium in Newark, NJ. This was nearly twenty years ago, but I still have my program files and would love to have the matching planetarium equipment (the ZKP3, not the Universarium!). I am also renovating a building and considering installing a 16-20' dome, which would house the projector.

Two questions that I need help with:
1. What is the expected price range for a secondhand ZKP2 or ZKP3?
2. Where do I find one for sale? Is this the best forum, or are there others? Ebay? Craigslist?

I am in Michigan and can travel quite a distance for pickup if the right equipment becomes available. I see that the Dreyfuss replaced its ZKP3 in 2010 (aargh!!), but perhaps someone knows its whereabouts these days.

Thanks!

Garrick
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moonmagic
post Apr 17 2018, 01:34 PM
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Garrick,

Hello and welcome!

While the basic understanding is that something is worth what you are willing to pay for it....this can range from FREE if you are willing to bring a crew and remove the projector to upwards of $10-15K for something used, but still working. The key is to NEGOTIATE a deal. Sometimes a place changing from optical to digital are under tight time-lines to get the old unit out and the new one in. Thus, if you are willing to help them out of their jamb they may be more willing to work with you.

Perhaps your biggest obstacle is finding the specific make/model machine you desire. You best invest in a copy of a listing of the world's planetariums and then do a search by machine type and make calls to determine where such changes are anticipated. You might also consider calling the USA rep for Zeiss and asking if they are aware of any of that model machine planned for replacement.

While I note that you have background in working with such machines, I assume you are aware that certain optical projectors are MATCHED to certain dome sizes, so it would be best to find the machine first before building your structure and acquiring your dome.
I will tell you from experience that finding machines is easier than acquiring or building your own dome, although with your background you may not view that as an issue.

You will want to constantly check all avenues, as machines these days pop up in various postings. So always check the epay site. You might also consider accepting other make/model machines, as they are all similar in many ways. There might even be people out there who would be willing to go and take out a machine for you and ship it to you or bring it to you for a fee of course.

You might want to join an on-line group called domeL where you may see announcements of machines becoming available. This is a site used by many planetarium professionals. You might also want to become knowledgeable of the many vendors of equipment for planetariums as they may all have contacts throughout the industry. Networking is a good idea and a few phone calls or emails can't hurt. There are many pitfalls out there too. Trying to work through the red tape of equipment owned by school systems, government organizations and even private Boards over Museums and Science Centers can be problematic.

Let people know what you are looking for. While there are others out there, you might want to talk to the people at Ash Enterprises. They sometimes have machines available as well as domes and have done many turn-key operations over the years, that is if you can settle for perhaps other Make/model machines.

The ones that come along for FREE still require significant investment on your part to undertake the cost of putting a crew together to go take one out. That process is like anything else. The task is always MORE than you will ever expect it to be. Sometimes better to hire someone like Ash (or others) to do the job for you. It may cost you less in the long run to have someone with wide experience so that you achieve the results you want. What's more they can also likely fix anything that is wrong or set you in the right direction.

There are others on this site with significant MORE knowledge about all of this than I have, but I thought I would try to get the ball rolling some for you. I hope this helps in some way. You might also want to consider joining one or more of the regional planetarium groups such as the Great Lakes Planetarium Association and/or the International Planetarium Society. They can direct you as to who publishes the annual listing of the planetariums of the world including contact information, plus all the vendors will have advertisements in their various bulletins and news letters which come out several times each year. Call one of your local planetariums and get contact information or use the internet for searches for those things I have mentioned.

The planetarium community has a tradition of being a helpful group of people. Generally, they will not think you are crazy for wanting your own! There are more of us out there in the last decade than at any time in the past, all since the advent of "traditional" machines being replaced by "digital" units. Again, good luck and perhaps others on this site will have some additional helpful words. mm
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moonmagic
post Apr 17 2018, 02:16 PM
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Garrick,

Here is an update to my previous post. Just after completing my reply to your initial post, I found a post on this site from a person in Washington State who has a planetarium projector that I think would be fine for the size dome you had mentioned. Again, if you are not 100% set on the make/model you first mentioned, this is a Spitz A3P. It is a very easy machine to take out and reconnect, and I understand it has been in storage for several years. Here is the post that appears under another heading of this same site:

++++++++++++++++

Greetings. Guy Worthey from Washington State University, where we have a 24 foot dome that seats 60.
A couple of years ago, we retired the Spitz A3P. It's time to pass it on.
We have several functioning arc lamps, the projection orrery, and the whole thing was working fine when we unbolted it.

I'm picking up that there are folks that might accept these wonderful things. I'm just pinging in here (rather than classifieds) to see if there's a market. Surely we are one of the last planetaria to give up on their Spitz A3P, so there may be no more market left. Furthermore, WSU has pretty strict procedures for selling surplus, so I want to know if it's worth the pain trying to buck the system and get the projector to somebody who wants it, or just hand it off to University Surplus and let them dispose of it.

Advice, please???

++++++++++++++++

You can view the reply I sent him elsewhere on this site. Such opportunities are infrequent. Suggest you try to work out something with him unless you cannot settle for anything other than the Zeiss....after all you could replace the A3P with the Zeiss should you ever find one available. This is in your court now. mm
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