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> State of the Art Planetariiums, Todays Monsters of the Midway!!
Owen Phairis
post Nov 18 2007, 06:35 PM
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QUOTE(Ron Walker @ Nov 18 2007, 12:56 PM) *
My wife's sister lives in Apple Valley which is fairly close to Big Bear Lake (I believe). Whenever we do this I will probably make it my base of operations. Perhaps Owen and I could drive down together.


Sure, would appreciate the company and conversation.

Owen
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jukingeo
post Dec 1 2007, 04:40 PM
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QUOTE(Ken Miller @ Nov 17 2007, 04:04 PM) *
Exhibit 2: [attachment=1175:stuff6.jpg]


Ahhh, I see that someone likes to play with high voltage. I been toying around with the idea of making a Jaccob's lader with an old furnace transformer myself

Is that an old Kennedy tool box you have there? I have one of those at work (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif) . Those toolboxes are heavy as hell, but you gotta love all the compartments!

I think I recognize a few other things on those shelves as well (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif) .

JG
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bauersfeld
post Mar 23 2008, 06:11 PM
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QUOTE(Ron Walker @ Sep 12 2007, 10:04 AM) *
Old Ziess'es don't die, they just fade away. (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/huh.gif) I'd really love one, but where would you put it? It is basically twice the height of a tall man! (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif) Over 12 feet long is quite large indeed. Actually it would make an interesting thread to post pictures of the various projectors with people in them for a true perspective of size.


"Old Ziess'es don't die" it's true - the UNIVERSAL MKII made in 1928 were 5,4 meter(!) tall, it weighs more than 2,7 tons and the starball's (made of milled sheet metal) thickness is 1,79 mm (imagine it's dropped on your foot in your backyard in 2035 (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/tongue.gif) !!!!!)

Anyway, if you don't know where to put it, you can convince your wife what a gorgeous plant-holder that is... (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif)
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Ken Miller
post Mar 25 2008, 06:13 PM
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I made another visit to the De Anza planetarium today and spent some time with the planetarium director and one of the school's astronomy instructors. I got to observe a typical grade school field trip presentation while I was there.

The opto-mechanical projector is a Konica Minolta "Infinium S". It uses star field image plates plus 21 individual lensed projectors for the brightest stars. Each of these brightest star projectors is fed by its own optical fiber. The digital projection is done by two Sony video projectors that are part of a Sky Skan Digital Sky 2 "Definiti" system.

While we were talking to the astronomy instructor I found out that he is the former director of the Buhl planetarium in Pittsburgh. He rode herd on the Zeiss projector there for 30 years.

Here's some photos:

Attached File  Minolta_projector_1.jpg ( 74.86k ) Number of downloads: 3


The extended row of projectors in front of the projector is the planet projectors.
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Ken Miller
post Mar 25 2008, 06:15 PM
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Another view of the projectors
Attached File  Minolta_projector_2.jpg ( 79.34k ) Number of downloads: 2
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Ken Miller
post Mar 25 2008, 06:17 PM
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Some of the small projectors for constellation outlines, etc.
Attached File  Minolta_fixed_projectors.jpg ( 81.9k ) Number of downloads: 2
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Ken Miller
post Mar 25 2008, 06:18 PM
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The projector rises up out of the well to reach its full height
Attached File  Minolta_projector_3.jpg ( 98.46k ) Number of downloads: 2
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Ken Miller
post Mar 25 2008, 06:21 PM
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One of the twilight projectors:
Attached File  minolta_twilight.jpg ( 85.3k ) Number of downloads: 2
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Ken Miller
post Mar 25 2008, 06:23 PM
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More small projectors at the base of the starball assembly (pointers to the stars, etc.)
Attached File  more_fixed_projectors.jpg ( 76.26k ) Number of downloads: 2
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Ken Miller
post Mar 25 2008, 06:24 PM
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The starball:
Attached File  starball.jpg ( 75.69k ) Number of downloads: 2
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jukingeo
post Mar 25 2008, 08:23 PM
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QUOTE(Ken Miller @ Mar 25 2008, 07:13 PM) *
I made another visit to the De Anza planetarium today and spent some time with the planetarium director and one of the school's astronomy instructors. I got to observe a typical grade school field trip presentation while I was there.

The opto-mechanical projector is a Konica Minolta "Infinium S". It uses star field image plates plus 21 individual lensed projectors for the brightest stars. Each of these brightest star projectors is fed by its own optical fiber. The digital projection is done by two Sony video projectors that are part of a Sky Skan Digital Sky 2 "Definiti" system.

While we were talking to the astronomy instructor I found out that he is the former director of the Buhl planetarium in Pittsburgh. He rode herd on the Zeiss projector there for 30 years.



The extended row of projectors in front of the projector is the planet projectors.


Hmmm, that is an odd looking projector. Never seen one like it before
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charles jones
post Mar 26 2008, 07:20 PM
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Ken, do you know where the planet projectors are? Are they totally separate from the rotating star ball?


Ken - I have re-read your posts and see that you've indicated the row of planet projectors.

It amazes me that, even computer driven, they will move with the rotation of daily motion.
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Ron Walker
post Mar 27 2008, 11:34 AM
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QUOTE(charles jones @ Mar 26 2008, 06:20 PM) *
Ken, do you know where the planet projectors are? Are they totally separate from the rotating star ball?
Ken - I have re-read your posts and see that you've indicated the row of planet projectors.

It amazes me that, even computer driven, they will move with the rotation of daily motion.


Having worked with both computers and old fashioned gear driven equipment I have come to the conclusion that even though more accurate and faster, computers crash just when you need them. Gears just keep on turning and turning.

Also it seems that you need to replace the computer systems much more often then gear systems. I guess I'm just getting old or my heart is still in the last millennium. (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif)
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Owen Phairis
post Mar 27 2008, 12:50 PM
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QUOTE(Ron Walker @ Mar 27 2008, 10:34 AM) *
Having worked with both computers and old fashioned gear driven equipment I have come to the conclusion that even though more accurate and faster, computers crash just when you need them. Gears just keep on turning and turning.

Also it seems that you need to replace the computer systems much more often then gear systems. I guess I'm just getting old or my heart is still in the last millennium. (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif)



Ron, its the 21 Century.... You just need to update your computers.

Attached File  IBM1620E.jpg ( 73.48k ) Number of downloads: 1
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mrgare5050
post Mar 27 2008, 01:13 PM
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hey we had an ibm 1440 in high school .. whats this, a 1620??/
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Owen Phairis
post Mar 27 2008, 01:23 PM
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QUOTE(mrgare5050 @ Mar 27 2008, 12:13 PM) *
hey we had an ibm 1440 in high school .. whats this, a 1620??/


The IBM 1620 was a half serial / half parallel computer from the early 60s. It was the machine I learned computer programing on. I learned machine language, assembler and Fortran on it. I think the last computer to use gears was the Norden Bobsight, which, BTW, worked pretty good!

Owen

Attached File  IBM1620_console_REE.jpg ( 73.38k ) Number of downloads: 1
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Ron Walker
post Mar 27 2008, 02:23 PM
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QUOTE(Owen Phairis @ Mar 27 2008, 11:50 AM) *
Ron, its the 21 Century.... You just need to update your computers.

Attached File  IBM1620E.jpg ( 73.48k ) Number of downloads: 1


I have 16 times!!!

But where did you find my new one. They told me mine was one of a kind. (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/huh.gif)
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Ron Walker
post Mar 27 2008, 02:31 PM
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QUOTE(Owen Phairis @ Mar 27 2008, 12:23 PM) *
The IBM 1620 was a half serial / half parallel computer from the early 60s. It was the machine I learned computer programing on. I learned machine language, assembler and Fortran on it. I think the last computer to use gears was the Norden Bobsight, which, BTW, worked pretty good!

Owen

Attached File  IBM1620_console_REE.jpg ( 73.38k ) Number of downloads: 1


Yeah, you see, gears....gears forever.....I bet the bombsight still works. Can the same be said of the 1620????

Actually my Commodore 64 still works but what would one use it for? Also I had to get into my old Windows 3.1 machine to find my last Resume (I need to update every 20 years or so) and I found it and it opened and printed, but what a s l o w machine. Not so long ago it was the "cats meow". (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif)
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Owen Phairis
post Mar 27 2008, 06:18 PM
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QUOTE(Ron Walker @ Mar 27 2008, 01:31 PM) *
Yeah, you see, gears....gears forever.....I bet the bombsight still works. Can the same be said of the 1620????

Actually my Commodore 64 still works but what would one use it for? Also I had to get into my old Windows 3.1 machine to find my last Resume (I need to update every 20 years or so) and I found it and it opened and printed, but what a s l o w machine. Not so long ago it was the "cats meow". (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif)



Yes, I have a Commodore 64 here too, also a Vic 20 till my kids took it. I am lucky enough to have bought an Altair 8800 Kit computer when they first came out in the mid 70s. I also have the old DEC PDP 11 computers from Mount Palomar. I used to hate that dreded blue screen when it would appear on Windows 98, now that I am running Windows XP Sevice Pack 2 I have been pretty satisfied.

There is no doubt in my mind that the Norden bomb sights are still working, however, the new planes require simultaneous tracking of ten boggies over one hundred miles away, hard to do with gears.... even the antenna is an electronically phased aray radar for speed.

Owen

Altair 8800
Attached File  altair.jpg ( 43.24k ) Number of downloads: 1
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Ron Walker
post Mar 27 2008, 06:30 PM
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QUOTE(Owen Phairis @ Mar 27 2008, 05:18 PM) *
Yes, I have a Commodore 64 here too, also a Vic 20 till my kids took it. I am lucky enough to have bought an Altair 8800 Kit computer when they first came out in the mid 70s. I also have the old DEC PDP 11 computers from Mount Palomar. I used to hate that dreded blue screen when it would appear on Windows 98, now that I am running Windows XP Sevice Pack 2 I have been pretty satisfied.

There is no doubt in my mind that the Norden bomb sights are still working, however, the new planes require simultaneous tracking of ten boggies over one hundred miles away, hard to do with gears.... even the antenna is an electronically phased aray radar for speed.

Owen

Altair 8800
Attached File  altair.jpg ( 43.24k ) Number of downloads: 1


Actually my rather weird sense of humor is rearing its ugly head. I'm basing my bias on the number of mechanical film cameras I've had compared to the video ones.

Without these new finagled computers we couldn't have OCP and be talking about old geared machines! (IMG:http://www.observatorycentral.com/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif)

I just picked up a Magellan GPS auto navigation device and it's almost uncanny as to how accurate the thing is. Talk about 1984! I think about the computer they had on the LEM back in 1969 and it had a whopping 4 or 8K of memory. I hope I last another 25 years as it will be interesting to see what happens. I'll still be running my gears though as I really love that kind of thing. I wonder if bulbs will still be available?
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