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> Boston Hayden Korkosz Projector, Some pieces I have aquired...
pielock373
post Jan 12 2010, 07:11 PM
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A few years ago while doing some work in the Boston area I purchased some equipment When I got home I ran into an interesting box labeled Korkosz parts. Low and behold it had these two items in it. These are two actual projectors that were once mounted in the Boston Korkosz projector. The long thin unit is what was called a "Bright star" projector The star being projected with this unit is Algenib. And the larger unit is a deep star field projector. These are the only two pieces left of this magnificent machine! All these pieces were manufactured about 35 miles away from me in Springfield Ma. The same town where the only remaining functional Korkosz projector lives today at the Springfield Science Museum giving daily planetarium shows.

(IMG:http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg227/pielock373/CIMG6125.jpg)


Left is the star image output adjustment mirrors for the bright star projector. Right is the condensing lens for the star plate.
(IMG:http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg227/pielock373/CIMG6129.jpg)


Hand ingraved star identifier, I often wonder if Fank Korkosz himself ingraved this!
(IMG:http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg227/pielock373/CIMG6131.jpg)

Here is an image of the horizon cut off inside the star field projector.
(IMG:http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg227/pielock373/CIMG6132.jpg)


A back lit image of the deep field star plate
(IMG:http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg227/pielock373/CIMG6135.jpg)
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Ron Walker
post Jan 13 2010, 01:12 PM
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Great stuff and great find!!!

I'm guessing that is a star plate from one of the 3-4 or 5-6 magnitude star projectors. That must have been some projector to see considering that there were separate star projectors for the various magnitude classes.

I never realized that there were individual projectors for the bright stars as the 1-2 magnitude stars had their own star balls. Very interesting.
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pielock373
post Feb 2 2010, 10:05 AM
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A picture of the Korkosz Projector.

(IMG:http://www.pielock.com/kork2.jpg)
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charles jones
post Feb 3 2010, 06:27 PM
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Did this projector ever have planetary motion?

Charles
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pielock373
post Feb 3 2010, 07:37 PM
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No, The Korkosz brothers always promised to get to installing planets into those two Blue/gray disc areas on the machine but never came through with the promised planets. That was one of the chief reasons why it was later dismantled. The Korkosz projector still in use at the Springfield Science Museum in Ma. also has no planets. So technically speaking both machine were Stellariums!

Steve
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RichardPini
post Nov 30 2013, 10:56 PM
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Attached File  Korkosz_solar_gear_sm3.jpg ( 99.73k ) Number of downloads: 5


"These are the only two pieces left of this magnificent machine!"

Happily, not quite. When I worked there in the early 1970s, there were still parts floating around in the "to be recycled" box, and I "liberated" another of the bright star projectors, as well as the magnificent 14-inch diameter solar gear. This machine deserved to be saved for history, not scrapped as it was.
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Ron Walker
post Dec 1 2013, 12:16 AM
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Hi Richard and welcome to OCP. It's great that you were able to save some of the history of this unique machine. It is a shame it all wasn't saved. You say this was a solar gear. Does that mean that parts for a Sun projector were started, or perhaps a main drive gear at the central core that was designed to drive a drive shaft that went through all of the planet cages on one side of the projector.?

I can not understand why the later generations of star machines are many times junked while no one would even think of junking an 18th century orrery.

Another case in point is how much time and money was spent to rebuild the old Atwood globe as an exhibit at the Adler planetarium, and yet saving the Zeiss VI appears not to have be considered. Perhaps there is information that I'm not privy to, but just putting part or all of the projector on static display is not my idea of preservation. It would seem a fairly simple task to either have a pit to lower the old projector into or perhaps a simple track arrangement to move the machine out of the dome. That way it could be brought back for a few shows a month or year. It would have been nice to see.
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RichardPini
post Dec 1 2013, 08:20 AM
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Truth to tell, my calling it the "solar gear" might not be entirely accurate. That's what I remember it being called when I went to work there, 40 years ago straight out of college. Listening to the other guys talk about the Korkosz, as we'd go through the boxes of parts looking for lenses or mirrors or whatever to incorporate into newer effects projectors, my impression was that this was perhaps as you describe it, a main drive gear. I wasn't aware, in those days, that it didn't show the planets (and thus likely not the sun or moon either). So over the years I've probably romanticized the gear itself into some wonderful, central "heart" kind of thing. It still looks the part, though.

This is actually the second planetarium projector I've had scrapped "out from under me" in a way. After my stint at the Hayden, I was the director (and sole operator) of a 30-foot planetarium that was built into the then-new Taunton (Mass.) High School, in 1975. They'd bought a Minolta Viewlex optical projector, and it was a sweet machine. I ran the program there for four years, then moved on. I learned later that, for a couple of years, they didn't fill my position for whatever reasons, and then did find someone to take over for a few more years. But finally, they simply mothballed the projector and then, when they needed the space for more classrooms, dismantled the dome and scrapped the projector. Had they bothered to let me know, I'd have taken it and stored it at my own expense, at the very least! (Or maybe, had I known about them, arranged for it to go to these fellows: www.planetariummuseum.org )
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Ron Walker
post Dec 1 2013, 12:32 PM
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I can never understand why all of these perfectly useable machines are just junked. Perhaps it is part of the OPM (other peoples money) syndrum. Since it was paid for by federal government or local school district tax dollars, it has no value to the decision makers. I can see their logic in wanting more classroom space as each live body gets them more tax dollars. But why not just put the projector on rollers and move it out of the way between shows for classroom use?
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